References

Abramowicz, D.  (2001). The library in the Vilna ghetto. In J. Rose (Ed.), The Holocaust and the book: destruction and preservation (pp. 165-170). Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press.

Abzug, R.H. (1999). America views the Holocaust, 1933-1945: a brief documentary history. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s.

Bytwerk, R. (n.d.). German propaganda archive. Retrieved from http://www.calvin.edu/academic/cas/gpa/

dizzo95. (2009, January 8). Nazi book burning rally. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bGHzOJlC6eo&feature=related

Finkelstein, D., & McCleery, A. (2005). An introduction to book history. New York: Routledge.

Fishman, D.E. (2001). Embers plucked from the fire: The rescue of Jewish cultural treasures in Vilna. In J. Rose (Ed.), The Holocaust and the book: destruction and preservation (pp. 66-78). Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press.

Herf, J. (2006). The Jewish enemy: Nazi propaganda during World War II and the Holocaust. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press.

Hill, L.E. (2001). The Nazi attack on “un-German” literature, 1933-1945.  In J. Rose (Ed.), The Holocaust and the book: destruction and preservation (pp. 9-46). Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press.

Horn, J. (1996).  Mark it with a stone: A moving account of a young boy’s struggle to survive the Nazi death camps. New York: Barricade Books.

Kruk, H. (2001). Library and reading room in the Vilna ghetto, Stashun Street 6. (Z.M. Baker, Trans.). In In J. Rose (Ed.), The Holocaust and the book: destruction and preservation (pp. 171-200). Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press.

Lipstadt, D.E. (1986).  Beyond belief: the American press and the coming of the Holocaust, 1933-1945. New York: Free Press.

Lipstadt, D.E. (1993). Denying the Holocaust: The growing assault on truth and memory. New York: Penguin Group.

Novick, P. (1999). The Holocaust in American life. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

Olmert, M. (1992). The Smithsonian book of books. Washington: Smithsonian Institution.

Perry, S.P. (2001).The secret voice: Clandestine printing in the Netherlands, 1940-1945.  In J. Rose (Ed.), The Holocaust and the book: destruction and preservation (pp. 107-127). Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press.

Rose, J. (2001). Introduction. In J. Rose, (Ed.). The Holocaust and the book: destruction and preservation (pp. 1-8). Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press.

Sutter, S.C . (2001). Polish books in exile: Cultural booty across two continents, through two wars. In J. Rose (Ed.), The Holocaust and the book: destruction and preservation (pp. 143-164). Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press.

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (n.d.). Book burning: Historical film footage. Retrieved from http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/media_fi.php?ModuleId=10005852&MediaId=158

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (n.d.) Propaganda. Retrieved from http://www.ushmm.org/propaganda/

 

 

IMAGE CREDITS:

American Jewish Museum. (n.d.). Fighting the fires of hate: America and the Nazi book burnings [artifact]. Retrieved from http://www.jccpgh.org/page/ajm

Bytwerk, R. (n.d.). The eternal Jew [photo]. (Munich: Zentralverlag der NSDAP., Franz Eher, Nachf., 1937). Retrieved from http://www.calvin.edu/academic/cas/gpa/images/diebow/scan1.jpg

Bytwerk, R. (n.d.). The eternal Jew [photo]. (Munich: Zentralverlag der NSDAP., Franz Eher, Nachf., 1937). Retrieved from http://www.calvin.edu/academic/cas/gpa/images/diebow/scan2.jpg

Bytwerk, R. (n.d.). The eternal Jew [photo]. (Munich: Zentralverlag der NSDAP., Franz Eher, Nachf., 1937). Retrieved from http://www.calvin.edu/academic/cas/gpa/images/diebow/scan3.jpg

National Archives and Records Administration. (1998). 18th Century Hebrew books uncovered in Heidelberg, Germany (NARA-111-SC-342901) [photo]. Retrieved from http://www.archives.gov/research/holocaust/records-and-research/searching-records-relating-to-nazi-gold2.html

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (n.d.) A 1934 issue of the fiercely antisemitic newspaper Der Stürmer [artifact]. Retrieved from http://www.United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.org/propaganda/archive/der-sturmer-article/

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (n.d.) A young man looks at the antisemitic caricature in the display window of the Danzig office of “Der Stuermer.” The poster reads: “The Jews are our misfortune.” Danzig, 1939 [photo]. (Danzig, 1939). Retrieved from http://www.United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.org/wlc/en/media_ph.php?ModuleId=10007316&MediaId=1857

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (n.d.). Antisemitic isolationist publication. United States, date uncertain [artifact]. Courtesy of National Museum of American Jewish History. Retrieved from http://www.United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.org/wlc/en/media_ph.php?ModuleId=10005182&MediaId=1061

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (n.d.). Antisemitic propaganda. United States, date uncertain [artifact]. Courtesy of National Museum of American Jewish History. Retrieved from http://www.United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.org/wlc/en/media_ph.php?ModuleId=10005182&MediaId=1062

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (n.d.). Cover of an anti-Semitic children’s book [artifact]. (1936). Retrieved from http://www.United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.org/propaganda/archive/antisemitic-childrens-book/

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (n.d.). Cover of an antisemitic schoolbook titled Der Giftpilz (The Poisonous Mushroom) [artifact]. Retrieved from http://www.United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.org/propaganda/archive/cover-poisonous-mushroom/

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (n.d.). Cover of an underground Yiddish newspaper, “Jugend Shtimme” (Voice of Youth). Writing on the bottom of the cover reads: “Fascism must be smashed.” Warsaw ghetto, Poland, January-February 1941 [artifact]. Courtesy YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, New York. Retrieved from http://www.United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.org/wlc/en/media_ph.php?ModuleId=10007224&MediaId=6071

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (n.d.) Der Stürmer front page, January 1939 [artifact]. Retrieved from http://www.United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.org/propaganda/archive/der-sturmer-january-1939/

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (n.d.) Entrance to “The Eternal Jew” exhibition [photo]. (Vienna, 1938). Retrieved from http://www.United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.org/propaganda/archive/entrance-eternal-jew-exhibition/

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (n.d.) Front page of the most popular issue ever of the Nazi publication, Der Stürmer [artifact]. Retrieved from http://www.United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.org/propaganda/archive/der-sturmer-ritual-murder/

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (n.d.). German children reading an anti-Semitic schoolbook [photo]. (Germany). Retrieved from http://www.United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.org/propaganda/archive/children-reading-mushroom/

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (n.d.). German students gather around books they regard as “un-German.” The books will be publically burned at Berlin’s Opernplatz. Berlin, Germany, May 10, 1933 [photo]. Courtesy of National Archives and Records Administration. Retrieved from http://www.United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.org/wlc/en/media_ph.php?ModuleId=10005852&MediaId=3536

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (n.d.). Holocaust denial – Stacks of German documents collected by war crimes investigators as evidence of the Holocaust [photo]. Courtesy of National Archives and Records Administration. Retrieved from http://www.United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.org/museum/exhibit/focus/denial/

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (n.d.). Illustration from a children’s book. The headlines say “Jews are our misfortune” and “How the Jew cheats.” Germany, 1936 [artifact]. (Germany, 1936). Retrieved from http://www.United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.org/wlc/en/media_ph.php?ModuleId=10005175&MediaId=606

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (n.d.). Illustration from an antisemitic children’s primer. The sign reads “Jews are not wanted here.” Germany, 1936 [artifact]. (Germany, 1936). Retrieved from http://www.United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.org/wlc/en/media_ph.php?ModuleId=10005175&MediaId=605

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (n.d.) Nazi officials attend the opening of “Der ewige Jude” (The Wandering Jew), an antisemitic exhibition in Munich. The exhibit segment on the left claims that “usury and the fencing of goods” were always the “privilege” of Jews. Munich, Germany, November 8, 1937 [photo]. (Munich, 1937). Courtesy of National Archives and Records Administration. Retrieved from http://www.United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.org/outreach/en/media_ph.php?ModuleId=10007691&MediaId=6991

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (n.d.). Page from anti-Semitic children’s book [artifact]. Retrieved from http://www.United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.org/propaganda/archive/page-antisemitic-childs-book/

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (n.d.) Page from an anti-Semitic coloring book [artifact]. Retrieved from http://www.United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.org/propaganda/archive/antisemitic-coloring-book/

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (n.d.). Page from The Poisonous Mushroom [artifact]. Retrieved from http://www.United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.org/propaganda/archive/poisonous-mushroom-book/

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (n.d.) Page of “Der Stuermer” (The Attacker) showing an antisemitic photomontage, Germany, 1939. This image was presented as evidence at the Nuremberg trials [artifact]. Courtesy of National Archives and Records Administration. Retrieved from http://www.United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.org/wlc/en/media_ph.php?ModuleId=10007316&MediaId=6275

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (n.d.). Poster: “Behind the enemy powers: the Jews” [artifact]. Retrieved from http://www.United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.org/propaganda/archive/poster-behind-enemy-powers/

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (n.d.). Poster: “He is guilty for the war” [artifact]. (1939). Retrieved from http://www.United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.org/propaganda/archive/poster-guilty-war/

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (n.d.) State of deception: Power of Nazi propaganda [artifact]. Retrieved from http://www.United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.org/museum/press/kits/download.php?content=propaganda&image=prop_3

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (n.d.). Street vendor sells old Hebrew books. Warsaw ghetto, Poland, February 1941 [photo]. (Bildarchiv Preussischer Kulturbesitz). Retrieved from http://www.United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.org/wlc/en/media_ph.php?MediaId=1788

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (n.d.). Students and members of the SA unload books deemed “un-German” during the book burning in Berlin. The banner reads: “German students march against the un-German spirit.” Berlin, Germany, May 10, 1933 [photo]. Courtesy of National Archives and Records Administration. Retrieved from http://www.United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.org/wlc/en/media_ph.php?ModuleId=10005852&MediaId=3547

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (n.d.). Students and members of the SA with armfuls of literature deemed “un-German” during the book burning in Berlin. Germany, May 10, 1933 [photo]. Courtesy of National Archives and Records Administration. Retrieved from http://www.United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.org/wlc/en/media_ph.php?ModuleId=10005852&MediaId=3548

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (n.d.). “The Eternal Jew” exhibition [artifact]. (1937). Retrieved from http://www.United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.org/propaganda/archive/eternal-jew-exhibition/

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